Succession planning for SMSF trustees

A responsibility that does not immediately spring to mind when managing a self-managed super fund is working out what will happen if a member becomes incapacitated and unable to perform their trustee duties. Succession planning for an SMSF can become quite complicated if not managed on an ongoing basis. It not only requires having a…

Cutting down to the essentials

Self-managed super funds (SMSFs) are an attractive option for those who want more control over their retirement savings. However, trustees who have run a fund for as long as SMSFs have been in existence (around 20 years) are likely to have accumulated a lot of paperwork, especially if they engaged in various super strategies throughout…

Contributing a lump sum into super

Australians can make two types of contributions each year; concessional contributions, which are taxed at 15 per cent, and non-concessional contributions, which are not taxed. There is a limit of $35,000 for concessional contributions and $180,000 for non-concessional contributions. However, individuals do have the option of using the three-year bring forward rule that allows taxpayers…

Five tips for creating a successful SMSF

There are many advantages to having a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF). Increased flexibility and control over your savings are the most obvious benefits, with many SMSF trustees and members appreciating the ability to make their own investment decisions. Here are five tips that can help set your SMSF up for success in 2016:  Have a…

What to consider before starting an SMSF

There are a lot of advantages to having a self-managed superannuation fund (SMSF). Increased flexibility and control over your savings are the most obvious benefits, with many SMSF trustees and members appreciating the ability to make their own investment decisions. Other advantages include the possibility of investing in a property, the ability to manage administrative…

Transition to retirement update

A transition to retirement allows older workers who are moving towards retirement to continue working, while at the same time, draw down on some of their superannuation benefits. Since its introduction in 2005 by the Australian Government, the policy has been used by many Australians as a strategy to save tax and boost super before…

The three phases of super

Having a basic understanding the different phases that your superannuation goes through during your life can help when it comes to working out the tax treatment of an individual’s fund and any pension they take. While not directly related, the overall investment strategy of a fund will also tend to change as the super transitions…

Transferring existing super to an SMSF

Individuals who plan to transfer their existing super from an industry fund into an SMSF needn’t worry about going over their superannuation contribution limit. Transferring these funds, also known as ‘rolling over’, is not considered to be a super contribution since the money is already somewhere in Australia’s superannuation system. It also does not count…

SMSF trust deeds

Trustees of SMSFs are governed by the rules and regulations set out in the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 (SIS Act) and the fund’s trust deed. Trustees need to regularly review the trust deed, as a transaction that is permittable through the SIS Act, may be prohibited according to the trust deed. Superannuation laws are…